Programmes

Where CEPF Works 

CEPF focuses on biodiversity hotspots​, which are represented on the map below. Our grants have supported civil society in 24 of the 36 biodiversity hotspots.​​​

Active Regions:

AFRICA & MADAGASCAR

EASTERN AFROMONTANE 
The Eastern Afromontane biodiversity hotspot stretches over a curving arc of widely scattered but biogeographically similar mountains, covering an area of more than 1 million square kilometers.


Senetti Plateau, Bale Mountains, Ethiopia. © Robin Moore/iLCP
 

GUINEAN FORESTS OF WEST AFRICA 
Only 15 percent of the original forest cover remains in this biodiversity hotspot.


Sierra Leone - women dancers performing. © Conservation International/photo by Nina Marshall
 

MADAGASCAR AND INDIAN OCEAN ISLANDS 
Madagascar and the Indian Ocean Islands are famous for their biodiversity.


Black-and-white ruffed lemur. © Conservation International/photo by Sterling Zumbrunn

ASIA-PACIFIC

EAST MELANESIAN ISLANDS
These islands qualify as a biodiversity hotspot due to their high levels of endemism and accelerating levels of habitat loss.​


Rennell Island, Solomon Islands.  © Conservation International/photo by Russell A. Mittermeier

INDO-BURMA
Indo-Burma is one of the most threatened of Earth’s 34 biodiversity hotspots. Only about 5 percent of its natural habitats remain in relatively pristine condition.


Waterfall in the Central Cardamoms. © Conservation International /Photo by Jake Brunner


Male wrasse (Cirrhilabrus tonozukai), Atauro Island. © Gerald Allen

WALLACEA
The Wallacea region (along with neighboring New Guinea) has more marine species than anywhere else on the planet, and it forms the heart of the Coral Triangle.

EUROPE & CENTRAL ASIA

MEDITERRANEAN BASIN
The Mediterranean Basin biodiversity hotspot is the second largest hotspot in the world and the largest of the world’s five Mediterranean-climate regions.


Iris sofarana keserwana
, endemic to Lebanon. © Magda Bou Dagher

MOUNTAINS OF CENTRAL ASIA (PROFILING FOR INVESTMENT)
The Mountains of Central Asia biodiversity hotspot's ecosystems range from glaciers to desert.


Dashti-Jum Reserve, Tajikistan. © Viktor Novikov

NORTH & CENTRAL AMERICA

CARIBBEAN ISLANDS (PROFILING FOR SECOND INVESTMENT)
This archepelago sustains an exceptional array of ecosystems ranging from montane cloud forests to cactus scrublands.


A hummingbird hovers over flowers on the island of Dominica, in the Caribbean. © Conservation International/photo by Sterling Zumbrunn

SOUTH AMERICA

CERRADO
The second largest of Brazil's major biomes, after Amazonia, the Cerrado accounts for a full 21 percent of the country's land area.


Greater Rhea, Alto Paraiso, Brazil. © O. Langrand

TROPICAL ANDES
Sometimes called the "global epicenter of biodiversity," the Tropical Andes is the biologically richest and most diverse of Earth's biodiversity hotspots.


Town in southern Ecuador. © Robin Moore/iLCP

For more details, please visit http://www.cepf.net/where_we_work/regions/Pages/regions.aspx