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Hornbills of China

Great Hornbill Buceros bicornis
Order: Bucerotiformes
Family: Bucerotidae
IUCN Red List: Near Threatened
CITES: Appendix I
State Key Protected Animal List of China: Class II

 

Oriental Pied Hornbill Anthracoceros albirostris 
Order: Bucerotiformes
Family: Bucerotidae
State Key Protected Animal List of China: Class II 

More info

 

Wreathed Hornbill Rhyticeros undulatus 
Order: Bucerotiformes
Family: Bucerotidae
State Key Protected Animal List of China: Class II 

 


About the Species

China is home to five hornbill species, namely Great Hornbill (Buceros bicornis), Rufous-necked Hornbill (Aceros nipalensis), Wreathed Hornbill (Rhyticeros undulatus), Oriental Pied Hornbill (Anthracoceros albirostris), and Austen’s Brown Hornbill (Anorrhinus austeni). They used to be widespread across the tropical forests of southwest Guangxi, south & southwest Yunnan and southeast Tibet.

Hornbills are highly specialised tropical birds and important dispersers of large-fruited trees since they have the biggest gape size amongst all forest birds of the region. They nest almost exclusively in large natural tree cavities, thus are extremely vulnerable to forest destruction. Hunting and forest loss have greatly decimated their populations in China and nowadays only survive in a few remote forest tracts. With the disappearance of hornbills, the future health of tropical forest in China is also jeopardised. Kadoorie Conservation China Department (KCC) has been collaborating with Guangxi Xidamingshan Provincial Nature Reserve and Yunnan Tongbiguan Provincial Nature Reserve to save these majestic birds from extinction since 2009. 

International Workshops for Hornbill Conservation in China

In order to raise awareness for Chinese hornbill conservation amongst government officials and civil society, and facilitate information exchange, KCC organised two workshops on hornbill conservation in 2011 and 2015, respectively. Chinese and international experts shared their experience in hornbill conservation and research, and made conservation recommendations to relevant protected areas and government departments. The first workshop was co-organised with the Wildlife Conservation Association of Guangxi; more than 30 Chinese and international delegates participated. The second workshop was co-organised with the People’s Government of Yingjiang County in Yunnan. The “Yingjiang Declaration” calling for enhanced conservation effort for Chinese hornbills was signed by more than 50 Chinese and international delegates, and an action plan was formulated.

Read more:

1. Oriental Pied Hornbill 

2. Guangxi’s aeroplane bird adds six new babies