KFBG Blog: Animal Stories

Animal Stories
Posted Date: Monday 10 August 2020
The Northern Red Muntjac (Muntiacus vaginalis) sometimes known as the Barking Deer is the only native deer species that is found in Hong Kong. It is also a mammal species we often receive at the Wild Animal Rescue Centre. Common causes of injury to these deer include dog attack, injuries from falling into catchwaters, entrapment in roadside railings and impacts with cars. Rehabilitation of barking deer is very challenging, in many cases, the injury itself is not the major cause of death for the rescued deer. A fatal, untreatable, stress-induced condition called ‘capture or exertional myopathy’ is frequently the reason that leads to treatment failure and death for many rescue cases.
Animal Stories
Posted Date: Thursday 25 June 2020
On 6 March 2020, we received this interesting looking legless reptile through our Wild Snake Rescue Project. Wait! Do you mean… this is a snake? No! It actually happens to be a legless lizard, called the European Glass Lizard (Pseudopus apodus) or the Sheltopusik (Shell-A-pill-sik), which means ‘yellow-bellied’ in Russian.
Animal Stories
Posted Date: Saturday 20 June 2020
Summer is upon us and we are now in the busiest season for the Wild Animal Rescue Centre (WARC). Let’s take a look at the role of the WARC as it applies to the rescue and rehabilitation of wild birds!
Animal Stories
Posted Date: Tuesday 2 June 2020
Everyday nestlings’ feathers will grow and become more dense, eventually the wing feathers are formed and they are ready to learn how to fly. Much like human children learning to walk, they may stumble or even accidentally fall from the tree branch. So sometimes people might find juvenile birds on the ground. When seeing them wandering around helplessly, a good Samaritan may want to pick them up and take care of them. Thus, we often find good intentioned citizens asking what to do with birds they have found, on the internet.
Animal Stories
Posted Date: Friday 8 May 2020
On 6 May, two young adult King Cobras (Ophiophagus hannah) were spotted by our Chairperson, Mr Andrew McAulay, on the Kwun Yum Shan hillside. In this rare opportunity he was able to watch what was most likely male cobras playing out a courtship and dominance dance. These two males are believed to be competing to demonstrate their strength and dominance and eventually one male will tire and the dominant male will, we think, start courtship with a nearby female King Cobra.